ALERT: Hawaii Bees Huge Decline, Now Endangered Species

save the bees 1080 organic hawaii

Recently Hawaii experienced it’s worst honey bee die-off since the survey began seven years ago. It’s estimated that a total of 38% of Hawaii honey bee colonies collapsed according to the latest 2015-2016 annual survey by the Bee Informed Partnership. California honeybee loss was at almost 40%. Highest honey bee loss in the entire US was in Mississippi at over 71%!

This is a sharp rise in honey bee die-offs from the previous survey year. In 2014-2015 only 14% Hawaii bee colonies experienced collapse. That year Hawaii had least die-offs in the entire US. We wrote about it because it was significant and very positive news. But, unfortunately things changed for the worse very quickly.

The Yellow-Faced Bee: Now Endangered Specie

For the first time in US history bees were added to the Endangered Species list. Seven species of yellow-faced bees native to Hawaii were added to the Endangered Species Act in 2016. Although, this protection came right after the recent 38% honeybee die-off, it took the Xerces Society almost a decade to convince the government to protect these Hawaiian bee species.

Potential Causes of Bee Deaths

The million dollar question is: “What caused a 2.7 time increase in Hawaiian honey bee deaths in just one year?” Indeed, there are numerous factors that can hurt the bees: pollution, toxic agricultural chemicals such as pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, loss of habitat due to development, as well as biological enemies such ants, mites, and viruses like varroa and nosema.

aluminum chemtrail nasa

Luminous vapor trail of tri-methyl aluminum (TMA). Credit: NASA

One less-talked-about potential bee-killer is Geoengineering. Geoengineering is also known as Weather Modification – a form of climate control practiced all over the world, including Hawaii. It’s ironic that the scientific community often dismisses it as “chemtrails conspiracy theory,” while on the other hand it promotes it as areal atmospheric spraying and cloud seeding.

For example, NASA admits using atmospheric “tracers” containing aluminum, lithium, barium and other particles. Lithium is also used in batteries and as an anti-psychotic drug. Aluminum is a neurotoxin with strong links to Alzheimer’s and nerve damage. Aluminum is also toxic to plants. Barium is toxic, as well.

lithium chemtrail nasa

Image of a daytime lithium trail from a sounding rocket launched from Wallops Island, Virginia, in July 2013. Credit: NASA

Another example is straight from Harvard University. In 2018 Harvard scientists are planning to spray an aerosol into the stratosphere to reflect the Sun’s heat to combat global warming. These researchers want to test several undisclosed materials. However, from our own research aluminum oxide particles are one of the main ingredients used for this purpose due to their reflectivity and low weight.

Furthermore, a 2015 research study on wild bumble bee population and aluminum exposure found that the bumble bee pupae were heavily contaminated with Aluminum in the UK. According to the study: “The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline. (…) colonies with high concentrations (of aluminum) in the pupae tended to have smaller pupae.”

Considering all of the above causes behind bee deaths it is our conclusion that it is not a single cause, but rather a combination of above causes responsible for collapses in bee populations.

Fake Substitutes Instead of Real Solutions?


RoboBee. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Tech companies and researchers are rushing to capitalize on the sharp decline in bees and other pollinators. After all, humanity and plants’ lives have depended on real living pollinators for thousands and millions of years, respectively. Why not replace them with artificial robots.

So now, instead of finding real solutions, some are quick to offer fake substitutes in the form of robot bees. or Autonomous Flying Robots is not science-fiction, they are tiny insect-like-drones developed by Harvard University.

It’s ironic that Harvard is also behind the proposed 2018 geoengineering experiment (mentioned above), which could harm real bees with aluminum oxide aerosol. There are other similar bee-robot developments taking place around the world, including Japan.

Real Solutions to Save the Bees

  1. Live the Organic Life. As much as possible, buy organic food, naturally derived household and personal care products. Organic farming specifically prohibits the use of bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides and many other agricultural chemicals that are harmful to the bees and other beneficial insects, such as the Monarch butterflies. In addition, conventional, non-organic agricultural chemicals wreak havoc on our own health through toxic residues in food. So it’s a win-win for the bees and for our own health when we buy organic.
  2. Start an organic garden. Turn that plain-old boring lawn into a mini-biosphere where bees can thrive. Bees need flowers to pollinate. Grow bee-friendly plants. Where there are no flowers, there’s no sustenance for the bees. In addition, your family can harvest healthy, ultra-fresh organic produce without having to go to the grocery store every time. Organic gardening is very grounding and a great way to connect to nature, while making a difference for the bee community.
  3. Awareness and sharing. Keep it simple. Share this knowledge with everyone and anyone. If everyone on Earth followed the first two steps outlined above the whole world would change and transform into a welcoming habitat for the bees and other beneficial pollinators. The whole world would heal and become harmonious once again.

The following photos are from our visit to an organic honeybee farm on the Big Island in 2016.

Article sources:

Bee Informed Partnership
Natural Society
Xerces Society
Dr. Mercola
Harvard University